Tag Archive | writing

Blog for the Sprog

sprog blogI have been in a rut. She reads well now, but her writing skills need some work. Also, it has become difficult to maintain relevance since she started school. A few more Japanese words creeping into sentences, still a willingness to keep up with practice but the materials we are using are hardly very motivating. However you want to call a workbook, it’s still a workbook. So I decided to go digital.

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From reception to production

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Now that they can read, how do we help the learner to become an independent writer? One of the difficulties is gaining the confidence to produce words yourself. We gamified (made fun) a writing practice activity that lays the path to long term retention of word shape or spelling.
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Writing Practice

Handwriting Practice

Nothing ground breaking here, just to introduce a good book and tell you why I like it. Read More…

Pop-Up Cards

 

making cards

Every occasion in the calendar provides an opportunity to do some sort of themed activity with the sprog. None so easy as making christmas cards. We used one of my resource books from when I was teaching in England to make some pop up christmas cards. Read More…

Story Writing Machine

Story Machine

If your sprog is progressing in their reading, you may like this simple activity for helping them to write a short story. There are many ways to do just that but this is fun and productive and will help to make some important distinctions about written English. Read More…

Get a Grip (2)

Pencil GripsLast year I wrote about the importance of the pencil grip (here) and how I have been using pencil grips and large-sized pencils to help my sprog achieve the desired result. 6 months on and I am still battling with this, but I think I have found a way forward. Read More…

Adding Up

pounds and penceOne of the books I brought back from the U.K was a beginners math book. It uses money as the focus and (at the beginning) keeps the problems simple. Recent experience with Australian students visiting my Japanese high school showed that of all the lessons they joined, the math lesson was the most stimulating because they could join in. There was no language barrier. Truly a universal language and another chance to practice writing skills; a simple math lesson seemed like a great idea for our morning 10 minute practice time. Read More…